bringing mic stands for two; 9/27

(Source: floralprintharry)

sir-p-audax:

The Diva in the dressing room before the shoot. My darling Ophelia <3

*Edit: I think the best part about this is I just put her on the set and she crawled up onto the vanity all by herself. All I did was slide the chair under her butt. She is just naturally a diva, I guess!

kittenstyles:

shout out 2 cheese for making life worth living

who greenlighted the whole “five new Twilight short films” thing and why

(Source: loracarol)

j4ya replied to your post: im sick and cant sleep, ask me how mch…

how mch do u hate transposing

i want to burn this book and all the transposing assignments page by page with a box of matches. i would pay someone to do all of my transposing homework. i will drop out of the music program just so i never have to transpose ever again

because i'm worried it's too soon to be falling in love again and i'm worried they don't/can't feel the same way about me
Anonymous

i don’t think you should be worried bebs, some people bounce back and fall in love just as fast as they fell out of it, i learned that the hard way a few times around but it’s just true, you might just fall fast and hard, and that’s okay. don’t worry about whether the other person feels the same way. enjoy how they make you feel, i srsly believe that you don’t need to actually be with someone to enjoy being in love, even if it’s one sided. also, honestly, it’s just life if they don’t feel the same way… i hope tht doesn’t come off as harsh but not everyone is going to reciprocate your feelings all of the time and sometimes u just gotta take it and roll with it. builds character or something my directors used to tell me. anyway i think the point of me talking was just to say there’s nothing to worry about, however you fall in love is just how you do, you can’t really control it, and you can’t control how the other person feels so just write sappy love poems and doodle mr/mrs/mx ______ in ur notebooks all day babes

My lawyer gives the same speech to everyone who wants to do business with me now. ‘Nicki is not one of those artists who allow her representatives to make decisions for her.’ I’m on conference calls all day with lawyers, accountants, and executives—people of power—and they treat me with respect. Because I command respect. I’m not cocky, but I deserve to know what’s going on. It’s my brand and my life. That’s my advice to women in general: Even if you’re doing a nine-to-five job, treat yourself like a boss. Not arrogant, but be sure of what you want—and don’t allow people to run anything for you without your knowledge. You want everyone to know, Okay, I can’t play games with her. I have to do right by this woman. That’s what it’s all about.
Nicki Minaj, Elle, April 2013 Adding partial source.  (via steepyoursoul)

(Source: hrafnagaldr)

wonkistan:

Reader Chris passes along an article about differences in American Sign Language usage between white and African-American signers. Researchers investigating what they call Black ASL found significant variations in signs, signing space, and facial cues. They explain:

Black ASL is not just a slang form of signing. Instead, think of the two signing systems as comparable to American and British English: similar but with differences that follow regular patterns and a lot of variation in individual usage.

They hypothesize that these differences began in segregated learning environments, and continue to evolve in Black social spaces. The whole article is worth a read.
Thanks, Chris, and remember — you can submit Wonk-worthy links through our ask or via email!
ETA, 9/24/12: Many of you have brought up the use of the word “mainstream” in this infographic. Better choices definitely exist, since this word rings of othering. We appreciate your nuanced and attentive readership!

wonkistan:

Reader Chris passes along an article about differences in American Sign Language usage between white and African-American signers. Researchers investigating what they call Black ASL found significant variations in signs, signing space, and facial cues. They explain:

Black ASL is not just a slang form of signing. Instead, think of the two signing systems as comparable to American and British English: similar but with differences that follow regular patterns and a lot of variation in individual usage.

They hypothesize that these differences began in segregated learning environments, and continue to evolve in Black social spaces. The whole article is worth a read.

Thanks, Chris, and remember you can submit Wonk-worthy links through our ask or via email!

ETA, 9/24/12: Many of you have brought up the use of the word “mainstream” in this infographic. Better choices definitely exist, since this word rings of othering. We appreciate your nuanced and attentive readership!